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Whole genome sequencing of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from patients, farm waste and canals in Thailand

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
163 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Whole genome sequencing of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from patients, farm waste and canals in Thailand
Published in
Genome Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13073-017-0471-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chakkaphan Runcharoen, Kathy E. Raven, Sandra Reuter, Teemu Kallonen, Suporn Paksanont, Jeeranan Thammachote, Suthatip Anun, Beth Blane, Julian Parkhill, Sharon J. Peacock, Narisara Chantratita

Abstract

Tackling multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli requires evidence from One Health studies that capture numerous potential reservoirs in circumscribed geographic areas. We conducted a survey of extended β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli isolated from patients, canals and livestock wastewater in eastern Thailand between 2014 and 2015, and analyzed isolates using whole genome sequencing. The bacterial collection of 149 isolates consisted of 84 isolates from a single hospital and 65 from the hospital sewer, canals and farm wastewater within a 20 km radius. E. coli ST131 predominated the clinical collection (28.6%), but was uncommon in the environment. Genome-based comparison of E. coli from infected patients and their immediate environment indicated low genetic similarity overall between the two, although three clinical-environmental isolate pairs differed by ≤ 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thai E. coli isolates were dispersed throughout a phylogenetic tree containing a global E. coli collection. All Thai ESBL-positive E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant, including high rates of resistance to tobramycin (77.2%), gentamicin (77.2%), ciprofloxacin (67.8%) and trimethoprim (68.5%). ESBL was encoded by six different CTX-M elements and SHV-12. Three isolates from clinical samples (n = 2) or a hospital sewer (n = 1) were resistant to the carbapenem drugs (encoded by NDM-1, NDM-5 or GES-5), and three isolates (clinical (n = 1) and canal water (n = 2)) were resistant to colistin (encoded by mcr-1); no isolates were resistant to both carbapenems and colistin. Tackling ESBL-producing E. coli in this setting will be challenging based on widespread distribution, but the low prevalence of resistance to carbapenems and colistin suggests that efforts are now required to prevent these from becoming ubiquitous.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 163 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 163 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 19%
Student > Master 23 14%
Researcher 17 10%
Student > Bachelor 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 30 18%
Unknown 39 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 21 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 6%
Other 17 10%
Unknown 52 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2017.
All research outputs
#5,627,303
of 20,520,938 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#946
of 1,329 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,302
of 288,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,520,938 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,329 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,616 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.