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Capturing Alzheimer's disease genomes with induced pluripotent stem cells: prospects and challenges

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, July 2011
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Title
Capturing Alzheimer's disease genomes with induced pluripotent stem cells: prospects and challenges
Published in
Genome Medicine, July 2011
DOI 10.1186/gm265
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mason A Israel, Lawrence SB Goldstein

Abstract

A crucial limitation to our understanding of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the inability to test hypotheses on live, patient-specific neurons. Patient autopsies are limited in supply and only reveal endpoints of disease. Rodent models harboring familial AD mutations lack important pathologies, and animal models have not been useful in modeling the sporadic form of AD because of complex genetics. The recent development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides a method to create live, patient-specific models of disease and to investigate disease phenotypes in vitro. In this review, we discuss the genetics of AD patients and the potential for iPSCs to capture the genomes of these individuals and generate relevant cell types. Specifically, we examine recent insights into the genetic fidelity of iPSCs, advances in the area of neuronal differentiation, and the ability of iPSCs to model neurodegenerative diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 6%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 62 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 21%
Student > Master 10 15%
Professor 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 54%
Neuroscience 11 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2012.
All research outputs
#8,170,690
of 10,768,289 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#772
of 825 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,488
of 87,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#9
of 13 outputs
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