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The mysterious Spotted Green Pigeon and its relation to the Dodo and its kindred

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 2,808)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
13 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The mysterious Spotted Green Pigeon and its relation to the Dodo and its kindred
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-14-136
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tim H Heupink, Hein van Grouw, David M Lambert

Abstract

The closely related and extinct Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) and Rodrigues Solitaire (Pezophaps solitaria), both in the subfamily Raphinae, are members of a clade of morphologically very diverse pigeons. Genetic analyses have revealed that the Nicobar Pigeon (Caloenas nicobarica) is the closest living relative of these birds, thereby highlighting their ancestors' remarkable migration and morphological evolution. The Spotted Green Pigeon (Caloenas maculata) was described in 1783 and showed some similarities to the Nicobar Pigeon. Soon however the taxon fell into obscurity, as it was regarded as simply an abnormal form of the Nicobar Pigeon. The relationship between both taxa has occasionally been questioned, leading some ornithologists to suggest that the two may in fact be different taxa. Today only one of the original two specimens survives and nothing is known about the origin of the taxon. Due to its potential close relationship, the Spotted Green Pigeon may hold clues to the historical migration, isolation and morphological evolution of the Dodo and its kindred.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 42 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Other 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 65%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 123. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2020.
All research outputs
#204,678
of 18,100,306 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#34
of 2,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,193
of 196,786 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,100,306 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,808 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,786 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them