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The path to re-evolve cooperation is constrained in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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16 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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41 Mendeley
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Title
The path to re-evolve cooperation is constrained in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1060-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisa T. Granato, Rolf Kümmerli

Abstract

A common form of cooperation in bacteria is based on the secretion of beneficial metabolites, shareable as public good among cells within a group. Because cooperation can be exploited by "cheating" mutants, which contribute less or nothing to the public good, there has been great interest in understanding the conditions required for cooperation to remain evolutionarily stable. In contrast, much less is known about whether cheats, once fixed in the population, are able to revert back to cooperation when conditions change. Here, we tackle this question by subjecting experimentally evolved cheats of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, partly deficient for the production of the iron-scavenging public good pyoverdine, to conditions previously shown to favor cooperation. Following approximately 200 generations of experimental evolution, we screened 720 evolved clones for changes in their pyoverdine production levels. We found no evidence for the re-evolution of full cooperation, even in environments with increased spatial structure, and reduced costs of public good production - two conditions that have previously been shown to maintain cooperation. In contrast, we observed selection for complete abolishment of pyoverdine production. The patterns of complete trait degradation were likely driven by "cheating on cheats" in unstructured, iron-limited environments where pyoverdine is important for growth, and selection against a maladaptive trait in iron-rich environments where pyoverdine is superfluous. Our study shows that the path to re-evolve public-goods cooperation can be constrained. While a limitation of the number of mutational targets potentially leading to reversion might be one reason for the observed pattern, an alternative explanation is that the selective conditions required for revertants to spread from rarity are much more stringent than those needed to maintain cooperation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 27%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 2%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 15%
Chemistry 2 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2020.
All research outputs
#2,830,689
of 23,001,641 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#650
of 2,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,542
of 316,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#18
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,001,641 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,916 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.