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Multiple osteochondromas

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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199 Dimensions

Readers on

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127 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple osteochondromas
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2008
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-3-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Judith VMG Bovée

Abstract

Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is characterised by development of two or more cartilage capped bony outgrowths (osteochondromas) of the long bones. The prevalence is estimated at 1:50,000, and it seems to be higher in males (male-to-female ratio 1.5:1). Osteochondromas develop and increase in size in the first decade of life, ceasing to grow when the growth plates close at puberty. They are pedunculated or sessile (broad base) and can vary widely in size. The number of osteochondromas may vary significantly within and between families, the mean number of locations is 15-18. The majority are asymptomatic and located in bones that develop from cartilage, especially the long bones of the extremities, predominantly around the knee. The facial bones are not affected. Osteochondromas may cause pain, functional problems and deformities, especially of the forearm, that may be reason for surgical removal. The most important complication is malignant transformation of osteochondroma towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, which is estimated to occur in 0.5-5%. MO is an autosomal dominant disorder and is genetically heterogeneous. In almost 90% of MO patients germline mutations in the tumour suppressor genes EXT1 or EXT2 are found. The EXT genes encode glycosyltransferases, catalyzing heparan sulphate polymerization. The diagnosis is based on radiological and clinical documentation, supplemented with, if available, histological evaluation of osteochondromas. If the exact mutation is known antenatal diagnosis is technically possible. MO should be distinguished from metachondromatosis, dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica and Ollier disease. Osteochondromas are benign lesions and do not affect life expectancy. Management includes removal of osteochondromas when they give complaints. Removed osteochondromas should be examined for malignant transformation towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma. Patients should be well instructed and regular follow-up for early detection of malignancy seems justified. For secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, en-bloc resection of the lesion and its pseudocapsule with tumour-free margins, preferably in a bone tumour referral centre, should be performed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Pakistan 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 122 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 15%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 12%
Student > Master 15 12%
Student > Postgraduate 14 11%
Other 29 23%
Unknown 18 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 65 51%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 21 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2022.
All research outputs
#5,400,582
of 21,140,081 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#651
of 2,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,368
of 208,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,140,081 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,361 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.