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Modelling the impact of the long-term use of insecticide-treated bed nets on Anopheles mosquito biting time

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

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31 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

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102 Mendeley
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Title
Modelling the impact of the long-term use of insecticide-treated bed nets on Anopheles mosquito biting time
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2014-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia P. Ferreira, Silas P. Lyra, Franciane Azevedo, David Greenhalgh, Eduardo Massad

Abstract

Evidence of changing in biting and resting behaviour of the main malaria vectors has been mounting up in recent years as a result of selective pressure by the widespread and long-term use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs), and indoor residual spraying. The impact of resistance behaviour on malaria intervention efficacy has important implications for the epidemiology and malaria control programmes. In this context, a theoretical framework is presented to understand the mechanisms determining the evolution of feeding behaviour under the pressure of use of ITNs. An agent-based stochastic model simulates the impact of insecticide-treated bed nets on mosquito fitness by reducing the biting rates, as well as increasing mortality rates. The model also incorporates a heritability function that provides the necessary genetic plasticity upon which natural selection would act to maximize the fitness under the pressure of the control strategy. The asymptotic equilibrium distribution of mosquito population versus biting time is shown for several daily uses of ITNs, and the expected disruptive selection on this mosquito trait is observed in the simulations. The relative fitness of strains that bite at much earlier time with respect to the wild strains, when a threshold of about 50% of ITNs coverage highlights the hypothesis of a behaviour selection. A sensitivity analysis has shown that the top three parameters that play a dominant role on the mosquito fitness are the proportion of individuals using bed nets and its effectiveness, the impact of bed nets on mosquito oviposition, and the mosquito genetic plasticity related to changing in biting time. By taking the evolutionary aspect into account, the model was able to show that the long-term use of ITNs, although representing an undisputed success in reducing malaria incidence and mortality in many affected areas, is not free of undesirable side effects. From the evolutionary point of view of the parasite virulence, it should be expected that plasmodium parasites would be under pressure to reduce their virulence. This speculative hypothesis can eventually be demonstrated in the medium to long-term use of ITNs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 102 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 23 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Environmental Science 4 4%
Other 22 22%
Unknown 30 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,517,129
of 21,460,400 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#288
of 5,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,159
of 291,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,460,400 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,353 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,491 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them