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Genetic susceptibility to advanced retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, September 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 206)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

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1 Facebook page
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Genetic susceptibility to advanced retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, September 2011
DOI 10.1186/1423-0127-17-69
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barkur S Shastry

Abstract

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vascular vitreoretinopathy that affects infants with short gestational age and low birth-weight. The condition is a multifactorial disease and is clinically similar to familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), which is a bilateral hereditary eye disorder affecting full-term infants. Both of them are characterized by the abnormal vessel growth in the vitreous that can lead to vitreoretinal traction, retinal detachment and other complications resulting in blindness. Despite the recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, ROP remains a major cause of childhood blindness in developed countries. The etiology of pathogenesis of advanced ROP is currently unknown. In the past, many causative factors such as length of time exposed to supplemental oxygen, excessive ambient light exposure and hypoxia have been suggested but evidence for these as independent risk factors in recent years is not compelling. It is not clear why ROP in a subset of infants with low birth-weight progresses to a severe stage (retinal detachment) despite timely intervention whereas in other infants with similar clinical characteristics ROP regresses spontaneously. Recent research with candidate gene approach, higher concordance rate in monozygotic twins and other clinical and experimental animal studies, suggest a strong genetic predisposition to ROP besides environmental factors such as prematurity. Three genes, which are involved in the Wnt signaling pathway, are mutated in both FEVR and in a small percentage of ROP disorder. However, none of the genetic factors identified thus far in ROP, account for a substantial number of patient population. Future studies involving genomics, bioinformatics and proteomics may provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology and management of ROP.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 16 26%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Psychology 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2011.
All research outputs
#834,266
of 3,852,176 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#27
of 206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,364
of 61,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,852,176 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 206 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 61,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.