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Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
166 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2006
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-1-27
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew RG Taylor, Elisa Carniel, Luisa Mestroni

Abstract

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular dilatation and impaired systolic function. Patients with DCM suffer from heart failure, arrhythmia, and are at risk of premature death. DCM has a prevalence of one case out of 2500 individuals with an incidence of 7/100,000/year (but may be under diagnosed). In many cases the disease is inherited and is termed familial DCM (FDC). FDC may account for 20-48% of DCM. FDC is principally caused by genetic mutations in FDC genes that encode for cytoskeletal and sarcomeric proteins in the cardiac myocyte. Family history analysis is an important tool for identifying families affected by FDC. Standard criteria for evaluating FDC families have been published and the use of such criteria is increasing. Clinical genetic testing has been developed for some FDC genes and will be increasingly utilized for evaluating FDC families. Through the use of family screening by pedigree analysis and/or genetic testing, it is possible to identify patients at earlier, or even presymptomatic stages of their disease. This presents an opportunity to invoke lifestyle changes and to provide pharmacological therapy earlier in the course of disease. Genetic counseling is used to identify additional asymptomatic family members who are at risk of developing symptoms, allowing for regular screening of these individuals. The management of FDC focuses on limiting the progression of heart failure and controlling arrhythmia, and is based on currently accepted treatment guidelines for DCM. It includes general measures (salt and fluid restriction, treatment of hypertension, limitation of alcohol intake, control of body weight, moderate exercise) and pharmacotherapy. Cardiac resynchronization, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices have progressively expanding usage. Patients with severe heart failure, severe reduction of the functional capacity and depressed left ventricular ejection fraction have a low survival rate and may require heart transplant.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 166 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Tunisia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 162 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 20%
Researcher 24 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 11%
Student > Master 17 10%
Student > Bachelor 15 9%
Other 34 20%
Unknown 25 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 73 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 8%
Sports and Recreations 4 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 2%
Other 18 11%
Unknown 33 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2019.
All research outputs
#5,964,633
of 18,294,628 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#819
of 1,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,497
of 202,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,294,628 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,963 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,158 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.