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Changes in trust and the use of Korean medicine in South Korea: a comparison of surveys in 2011 and 2014

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, September 2017
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in trust and the use of Korean medicine in South Korea: a comparison of surveys in 2011 and 2014
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1969-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Soohyun Kwon, Shinhee Heo, Dongjun Kim, Seunghyun Kang, Jong-Min Woo

Abstract

Korean medicine (KM) has been widely used in Korea. This study aimed to assess the general perceptions of KM, to investigate the patterns of its usage in 2014, and to compare the results with those of an earlier survey from 2011. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 1000 Korean people. The questionnaire included items regarding trust in KM, reasons for distrust of KM, and visit frequency to KM clinics. This study used methods consistent with those of a 2011 survey to examine changes in attitudes over 3 years. Despite high rates of trust in KM, the visit frequency decreased from 69.3% in 2011 to 63.2% in 2014. Usage among young adults (in their 20s and 30s) was significantly reduced compared to all other age groups. The KM modality most commonly used by participants was acupuncture, whereas the use of moxibustion and cupping therapies has decreased since 2011. Men and women were most likely to distrust KM due to a "lack of scientific evidence" (59.3%) and "suspicion of KM safety" (47.4%), respectively. The findings suggested that KM use and trust in KM were slightly lower in 2014 than in 2011. The decreases were most notable among individuals in their 30s and in the use of moxibustion in KM therapy. This study aimed to produce practical insights by reviewing patterns of KM use and perceptions over time. Additional surveys must be considered to produce a more in-depth analysis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 46%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 23%
Psychology 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Sports and Recreations 1 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2017.
All research outputs
#13,088,879
of 19,731,023 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,672
of 2,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,828
of 287,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,731,023 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,999 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,909 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them