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Iron deficiency parameters in autism spectrum disorder: clinical correlates and associated factors

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 907)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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91 Mendeley
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Title
Iron deficiency parameters in autism spectrum disorder: clinical correlates and associated factors
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13052-017-0407-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serkan Gunes, Ozalp Ekinci, Tanju Celik

Abstract

High prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has been reported in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, there is a limited number of studies about the association between iron deficiency parameters and clinical symptoms of ASD. This study aims to compare hemoglobin, hematocrit, iron, ferritin, MCV, and RDW levels between ASD patients and healthy controls and to investigate the correlation between these values and clinical symptoms of ASD. The sample consisted of 100 children in ASD patient group and 100 healthy controls, with an age range of 2-18 years. We used ferritin cutoff of < 10 ng/mL for preschoolers (< 6 years) and < 12 ng/mL for school-aged (> 6 years) children to evaluate ID. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin < 11.0 g/dL for preschoolers and < 12.0 g/dL for school-aged children. Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Autism Behavior Checklist (AuBC), and Aberrant Behavior Checklist (AbBC) were used to evaluate the severity of autistic symptoms and behavioral problems. Categorical variables were compared by using chi-square test. Normally distributed parametric variables were compared between groups by using Independent Samples t test. Pearson's correlation analysis was used in order to examine the correlations. The p value < 0.05 was accepted to be statistically significant. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, iron, and MCV (p < 0.05) levels of children with ASD were lower than healthy controls. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and MCV (p < 0.05) levels were found to be significantly lower in preschool ASD patients. Hemoglobin and hematocrit (p < 0.05) levels were significantly lower in ASD patients with intellectual disability. Hemoglobin (p < 0.05) levels were lower in patients with severe ASD. There was a significant negative correlation between hematocrit levels of children with ASD and CARS, AuBC, and AbBC total scores (p < 0.05). Hemoglobin levels of children with ASD were lower than healthy children, but this was not sufficient to result in anemia. IDA in children with ASD might be associated with intellectual disability instead of ASD symptom severity.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 22%
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 5%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 26 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 16%
Psychology 14 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 28 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2022.
All research outputs
#1,380,766
of 21,958,674 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#42
of 907 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,969
of 296,563 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,958,674 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 907 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,563 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them