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Predictive implications of albumin and C-reactive protein for progression to pneumonia and poor prognosis in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2017
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Title
Predictive implications of albumin and C-reactive protein for progression to pneumonia and poor prognosis in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2745-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaito Harada, Noritaka Sekiya, Tatsuya Konishi, Akihito Nagata, Yuta Yamada, Toshiaki Takezaki, Satoshi Kaito, Shuhei Kurosawa, Masahiro Sakaguchi, Shunichiro Yasuda, Shugo Sasaki, Kosuke Yoshioka, Kyoko Watakabe-Inamoto, Aiko Igarashi, Yuho Najima, Takeshi Hagino, Hideharu Muto, Takeshi Kobayashi, Noriko Doki, Kazuhiko Kakihana, Hisashi Sakamaki, Kazuteru Ohashi

Abstract

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) bacteremia causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. However, incidence and risk factors for mortality in S. maltophilia bacteremia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) remain controversial. The primary aim of this study is to clarify factors associated with poor prognosis of allo-HSCT recipients with S. maltophilia bacteremia. From January 2005 to December 2014, patients with hematological diseases and S. maltophilia bacteremia at a single transplantation center in Japan were examined for incidence and 90-day mortality. Prognostic factors associated with 90-day mortality among allo-HSCT recipients were analyzed by log-rank test, and significant variables in the univariate analysis were included in the multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression model. A total of 65 patients, including 47 patients undergoing allo-HSCT, developed S. maltophilia bacteremia. The incidence of S. maltophilia bacteremia was significantly higher in allo-HSCT recipients compared to patients not receiving allo-HSCT (6.53 vs. 0.36 per 100 admissions, respectively; p < 0.01). The overall 90-day mortality in allo-HSCT recipients was 43%. Independent risk factors for 90-day mortality were low serum albumin (<3.0 g/dl) (HR = 10.86; 95% CI, 3.27-36.12) and high serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (≥10.0 mg/dl) (HR = 3.28; 95% CI, 1.00-10.72). Among 9 patients with both high CRP and low albumin, 5 had pneumonia at the onset of bacteremia and the remaining 4 patients developed pneumonia in a median of 3 days (range, 1 to 8 days) even under effective treatment. All 9 patients eventually died in a median of 2 days (range, 2 to 32 days). The probabilities of developing pneumonia in patients with or without high CRP and low albumin levels were 100% (9/9) and 10.5% (4/38), respectively (p < 0.01). Allo-HSCT recipients had higher rates of S. maltophilia bacteremia than did patients not receiving allo-HSCT. High serum CRP and low serum albumin at the onset of bacteremia are predictive of disease progression to pneumonia and poor prognosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 21%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Master 4 12%
Lecturer 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 47%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 12 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2017.
All research outputs
#20,448,386
of 23,003,906 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#6,520
of 7,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#278,362
of 318,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#124
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,003,906 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,720 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,615 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.