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Alcohol consumption patterns and HIV viral suppression among persons receiving HIV care in Florida: an observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

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106 Mendeley
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Title
Alcohol consumption patterns and HIV viral suppression among persons receiving HIV care in Florida: an observational study
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13722-017-0090-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. L. Cook, Z. Zhou, N. E. Kelso-Chichetto, J. Janelle, J. P. Morano, C. Somboonwit, W. Carter, G. E. Ibanez, N. Ennis, C. L. Cook, R. A. Cohen, B. Brumback, K. Bryant

Abstract

Alcohol consumption has been associated with poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence but less is known about its relationship to HIV viral suppression, or whether certain drinking patterns have a stronger association than others. The objectives of this study were to determine the association of different patterns of alcohol consumption to HIV viral suppression and ART adherence, and to determine whether any associations of alcohol with HIV viral suppression were mediated by poor ART adherence. This observational study used baseline data from 619 HIV+ participants, recruited across 8 clinical and community settings across Florida as part of the Florida Cohort from 2014 to 2016. Alcohol consumption was measured by self-report, and grouped into four categories: heavy drinking (>7/week for women or >14 drinks/week for men); binge, but not heavy drinking (≥4 or >5 drinks/occasion for women and men, respectively), low level drinking (neither heavy nor binge), and abstinence. Serum HIV RNA measurements were obtained from statewide HIV surveillance data, and durable viral suppression was defined as achieving HIV viral suppression (<200 copies/ml) at every assessment in the past 12 months. The majority of the 619 participants were male (63%) and aged 45 or greater (65%). The proportion of participants with heavy, binge, low-level drinking and abstinence was 9, 25, 37 and 30%, respectively. Optimal ART adherence (≥95%) was reported by 68%, and 60% achieved durable viral suppression. In multivariable analysis controlling for demographic factors, drug use, and homelessness, heavy drinking (compared to abstinence) was associated with increased odds of failing to achieve durable viral suppression (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.08-4.32) whereas binge drinking alone was not significantly associated with this outcome (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.64-1.70). Both heavy drinking and binge drinking were significantly associated with suboptimal ART adherence. Mediation analyses suggested that only a small proportion of the relationship between heavy drinking and suboptimal viral suppression was due to poor ART adherence. Exceeding weekly recommended levels of alcohol consumption (heavy drinking) was significantly associated with poor HIV viral suppression and ART non-adherence, while binge drinking was associated with suboptimal ART adherence in this sample. Clinicians should attempt to address heavy drinking in their patients with HIV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 106 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Researcher 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 25 24%
Unknown 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 13%
Social Sciences 12 11%
Psychology 9 8%
Computer Science 4 4%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 35 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2017.
All research outputs
#13,175,336
of 23,577,654 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#254
of 428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,978
of 321,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,577,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 428 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 321,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.