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Identification and characterization of interferon signaling-related microRNAs in occult hepatitis B virus infection

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, September 2017
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Title
Identification and characterization of interferon signaling-related microRNAs in occult hepatitis B virus infection
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0404-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yiying Wang, Peifu Zhu, Jing Qiu, Jie Wang, Huijuan Zhu, Yinwei Zhu, Lige Zhang, Jie Zhu, Xingxiang Liu, Chen Dong

Abstract

Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) is an important risk factor of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Type 1 interferon (IFN) signaling-related miRNAs were significantly associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the characteristics of serum IFN signaling-related miRNAs in OBI remain unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the expression levels of serum IFN signaling-related miRNAs in OBI and to evaluate their potential values for OBI diagnosis. Twenty serum samples for training test (10 healthy controls and 10 OBI patients) and 438 validation serum samples from healthy controls, asymptomatic HBsAg carriers (ASC), and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and OBI patients were collected. Expression levels of 32 IFN signaling-related miRNAs were analyzed in training and validation sets of samples using RT-qPCR. Among 32 IFN signaling-related miRNAs, decreased miR-122 levels and increased miR-130a levels were detected in training OBI samples. Furthermore, the results from validation test showed that the mean serum miR-122 and miR-130a level was 2.28 ± 0.96 and 3.11 ± 0.93 in OBI subjects, respectively. Compared to the healthy controls, ASC and CHB patients, miR-122 levels were significantly downregulated, while miR-130a levels were significantly upregulated in OBI patients. ROC analysis indicated that miR-122 + miR-130a could differentiate OBI from healthy controls, ASC, and CHB (≥ 0.87 of AUC). Our study suggested that decreased serum miR-122 level and increased miR-130a level were significantly associated with OBI. Moreover, a combination of miR-122 and miR-130a could be served as a potential marker for OBI diagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 18%
Other 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 12%
Chemistry 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2018.
All research outputs
#11,534,604
of 12,980,529 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#563
of 618 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,459
of 271,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#14
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,980,529 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.