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Risk of psychological ill health and methods of organisational downsizing: a cross-sectional survey in four European countries

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2017
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Title
Risk of psychological ill health and methods of organisational downsizing: a cross-sectional survey in four European countries
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4789-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elena Andreeva, M. Harvey Brenner, Töres Theorell, Marcel Goldberg

Abstract

The manner in which organizational downsizing is implemented can make a substantial difference as to whether the exposed workers will suffer from psychological ill health. Surprisingly, little research has directly investigated this issue. We examined the likelihood of psychological ill health associated with strategic and reactive downsizing. A cross-sectional survey included 1456 respondents from France, Sweden, Hungary and the United Kingdom: 681 employees in stable workplaces (reference group) and 775 workers from downsized companies. Reactive downsizing was exemplified by the exposures to compulsory redundancies of medium to large scale resulting in job loss or surviving a layoff while staying employed in downsized organizations. The workforce exposed to strategic downsizing was represented by surplus employees who were internally redeployed and supported through their career change process within a policy context of "no compulsory redundancy". Symptoms of anxiety, depression and emotional exhaustion were assessed in telephone interviews with brief subscales from Hospital Anxiety Scale (HADS-A), Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-CD6) and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS). Data were analyzed using logistic regression. We observed no increased risk of psychological ill health in the case of strategic downsizing. The number of significant associations with psychological ill health was the largest for the large-scale reactive downsizing: surviving a layoff was consistently associated with all three outcome measures; returning to work after the job loss experience was related to anxiety and depression, while persons still unemployed at interview had elevated odds of anxiety. After reactive medium-scale downsizing, unemployment at interview was the only exposure associated with anxiety and depression. The manner in which organizational downsizing is implemented can be important for the psychological wellbeing of workers. If downsizing is unavoidable, it should be achieved strategically. Greater attention is needed to employment and health policies supporting the workers after reactive downsizing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 13 19%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 15 22%
Unknown 17 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 7%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 19 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,101,210
of 11,862,957 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,691
of 8,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,757
of 272,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#83
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,862,957 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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