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The efficacy of oral and subcutaneous antigen-specific immunotherapy in murine cow’s milk- and peanut allergy models

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, September 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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47 Mendeley
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Title
The efficacy of oral and subcutaneous antigen-specific immunotherapy in murine cow’s milk- and peanut allergy models
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13601-017-0170-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marlotte M. Vonk, Laura Wagenaar, Raymond H. H. Pieters, Leon M. J. Knippels, Linette E. M. Willemsen, Joost J. Smit, Betty C. A. M. van Esch, Johan Garssen

Abstract

Antigen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is a promising therapeutic approach for both cow's milk allergy (CMA) and peanut allergy (PNA), but needs optimization in terms of efficacy and safety. Compare oral immunotherapy (OIT) and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) in murine models for CMA and PNA and determine the dose of allergen needed to effectively modify parameters of allergy. Female C3H/HeOuJ mice were sensitized intragastrically (i.g.) to whey or peanut extract with cholera toxin. Mice were treated orally (5 times/week) or subcutaneously (3 times/week) for three consecutive weeks. Hereafter, the acute allergic skin response, anaphylactic shock symptoms and body temperature were measured upon intradermal (i.d.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) challenge, and mast cell degranulation was measured upon i.g. challenge. Allergen-specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a were measured in serum at different time points. Single cell suspensions derived from lymph organs were stimulated with allergen to induce cytokine production and T cell phenotypes were assessed using flow cytometry. Both OIT and SCIT decreased clinically related signs upon challenge in the CMA and PNA model. Interestingly, a rise in allergen-specific IgE was observed during immunotherapy, hereafter, treated mice were protected against the increase in IgE caused by allergen challenge. Allergen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a increased due to both types of AIT. In the CMA model, SCIT and OIT reduced the percentage of activated Th2 cells and increased the percentage of activated Th1 cells in the spleen. OIT increased the percentage of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and activated Th2 cells in the MLN. Th2 cytokines IL-5, IL-13 and IL-10 were reduced after OIT, but not after SCIT. In the PNA model, no differences were observed in percentages of T cell subsets. SCIT induced Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-10, whereas OIT had no effect. We have shown clinical protection against allergic manifestations after OIT and SCIT in a CMA and PNA model. Although similar allergen-specific antibody patterns were observed, differences in T cell and cytokine responses were shown. Whether these findings are related to a different mechanism of AIT in CMA and PNA needs to be elucidated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Other 3 6%
Librarian 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 14 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2017.
All research outputs
#3,998,509
of 15,922,255 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#228
of 480 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,459
of 281,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 480 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them