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Estimating the geographic distribution of human Tanapox and potential reservoirs using ecological niche modeling

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2014
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Title
Estimating the geographic distribution of human Tanapox and potential reservoirs using ecological niche modeling
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1476-072x-13-34
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin P Monroe, Yoshinori J Nakazawa, Mary G Reynolds, Darin S Carroll

Abstract

Tanapox virus is a zoonotic infection that causes mild febrile illness and one to several nodular skin lesions. The disease is endemic in parts of Africa. The principal reservoir for the virus that causes Tanapox is unknown, but has been hypothesized to be a non-human primate. This study employs ecological niche modeling (ENM) to determine areas of tropical Africa suitable for the occurrence of human Tanapox and a list of hypothetical reservoirs. The resultant niche model will be a useful tool to guide medical surveillance activities in the region. This study uses the Desktop GARP software to predict regions where human Tanapox might be expected to occur based on historical human case locations and environmental data. Additional modeling of primate species, using occurrence data from museum records was performed to determine suitable disease reservoirs. The final ENM predicts a potential distribution of Tanapox over much of equatorial Africa, exceeding the borders of Kenya and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) where it has been historically reported. Five genera of non-human primates were found to be potential reservoir taxa. Validity testing suggests the model created here is robust (p < 0.04). Several genera of primates were identified as having ENMs overlapping with that of Tanapox and are suggested as potential reservoirs, mainly members of the Genus Cercopithecus. The ENM modeling technique has several limitations and results should be interpreted with caution. This study may increase knowledge and engage further research in this neglected disease.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2014.
All research outputs
#20,237,640
of 22,764,165 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#547
of 627 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#264,844
of 305,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#30
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,764,165 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 627 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,303 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.