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Prevalence of hepatitis-C virus genotypes and potential transmission risks in Malakand Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, August 2017
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Title
Prevalence of hepatitis-C virus genotypes and potential transmission risks in Malakand Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan
Published in
Virology Journal, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12985-017-0829-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nausheen Nazir, Muhammad Rasul Jan, Amjad Ali, Muhammad Asif, Muhammad Idrees, Mohammad Nisar, Muhammad Zahoor, Naser M. Abd El-Salam

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic liver disease and frequently progresses towards liver cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of HCV genotypes and their association with possible transmission risks in the general population of Malakand Division. Sum of 570 serum samples were collected during March 2011 to January 2012 from suspected patients visited to different hospitals of Malakand. The suspected sera were tested using qualitative PCR and were then subjected to molecular genotype specific assay. Quantitative PCR was also performed for determination of pre-treatment viral load in confirmed positive patients. Out of 570 serum samples 316 sera were seen positive while 254 sera were found negative using qualitative PCR. The positive samples were then subjected to genotyping assay out of 316, type-specific PCR fragments were seen in 271 sera while 45 samples were found untypable genotypes. Genotype 3a was seen as a predominant genotype (63.3%) with a standard error of ±2.7%. Cramer's V statistic and Liklihood-Ratio statistical procedures are used to measure the strength and to test the association, respectively, between the dependent variable, genotype, and explanatory variables (e.g. gender, risk, age and area/districts). The dependent variable, genotype, is observed statistically significant association with variable risk factors. This implies that the genotype is highly dependent on how the patient was infected. In contrast, the other covariates, for example, gender, age, and district (area) no statistical significant association are observed. The association between gender-age indicates that the mean age of female was older by 10.5 ± 2.3 years with 95% confidence level using t-statistic. It was concluded from the present study that the predominant genotype was 3a in the infected population of Malakand. This study also highlights the high prevalence rate of untypable genotypes which an important issue of health care setup in Malakand and create complications in therapy of infected patients. Major mode of HCV transmission is multiple uses and re-uses of needles/injections. ISRCTN ISRCTN73824458. Registered: 28 September 2014.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Other 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Unspecified 3 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Unspecified 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,514,719
of 11,911,448 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,582
of 2,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,830
of 273,829 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#24
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,911,448 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,017 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.