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Morbidity and mortality of children aged 2–59 months admitted in the Tanzania Lake Zone’s public hospitals: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, October 2017
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2 tweeters

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103 Mendeley
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Title
Morbidity and mortality of children aged 2–59 months admitted in the Tanzania Lake Zone’s public hospitals: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-2818-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristina Lugangira, Method Kazaura, Festus Kalokola

Abstract

There is a growing concern about child mortality especially in developing countries. The Government of Tanzania and non-governmental organizations are fighting against diseases like malaria, anaemia, diarrhoea and pneumonia that contribute extensively to child mortality. This was a hospital-based, retrospective cohort study involving 1130 under-fives (excluding neonates) being either discharged from or died in public hospitals of the Lake Zone in Tanzania. We extracted information on symptoms and signs at admission, major diagnoses and causes of death from the medical records. We applied binary logistic regression models to assess risk factors associated with in-patient under-five death. The major leading morbidities include malaria (49%), anemia (37%), diarrhea (27%), pneumonia (22%) and severe acute malnutrition (21%). We found the case fatality of 74 deaths per 1000 under-five admissions. Major underlying causes of deaths were severe anaemia, severe malaria and severe pneumonia. Factors associated with in-patient death were female sex (AOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0, 2.8) and the odds significantly decreased with increasing level of maternal education. Malaria remains a leading cause of admissions in hospitals among under-fives. Although the case fatality among children aged between 2 and 59 months admitted in hospitals in Lake Zone is decreasing, efforts are needed to address major causes of deaths (severe anaemia, severe malaria and severe pneumonia).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 103 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 23%
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Student > Postgraduate 11 11%
Researcher 9 9%
Lecturer 4 4%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 25 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 15%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 30 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,648,936
of 13,796,475 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,568
of 3,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,001
of 275,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,796,475 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,130 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them