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Early coordinated rehabilitation in acute phase after hip fracture – a model for increased patient participation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, October 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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161 Mendeley
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Title
Early coordinated rehabilitation in acute phase after hip fracture – a model for increased patient participation
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12877-017-0640-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gillian Asplin, Gunnel Carlsson, Lena Zidén, Gunilla Kjellby-Wendt

Abstract

Studies have shown that patients with hip fracture treated in a Comprehensive Geriatric Care (CGC) unit report better results in comparison to orthopaedic care. Furthermore, involving patients in their healthcare by encouraging patient participation can result in better quality of care and improved outcomes. To our knowledge no study has been performed comparing rehabilitation programmes within a CGC unit during the acute phase after hip fracture with focus on improving patients' perceived participation and subsequent effect on patients' function. A prospective, controlled, intervention performed in a CGC unit and compared with standard care. A total of 126 patients with hip fracture were recruited who were prior to fracture; community dwelling, mobile indoors and independent in personal care. Intervention Group (IG): 63 patients, mean age 82.0 years and Control Group (CG): 63 patients mean age 80.5 years. coordinated rehabilitation programme with early onset of patient participation and intensified occupational therapy and physiotherapy after hip fracture surgery. The primary outcome measure was self-reported patient participation at discharge. Secondary outcome measures were: TLS-BasicADL; Bergs Balance Scale (BBS); Falls Efficacy Scale FES(S); Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and Timed Up and Go (TUG) at discharge and 1 month and ADL staircase for instrumental ADL at 1 month. At discharge a statistically significant greater number of patients in the IG reported higher levels of participation (p < 0.05) and independence in lower body hygiene (p < 0.05) and dressing (p < 0.001). There were however no statistically significant differences at discharge and 1 month between groups in functional balance and confidence, performance measures or risk for falls. This model of OT and PT coordinated inpatient rehabilitation had a positive effect on patients' perceived participation in their rehabilitation and ADL at discharge but did not appear to affect level of recovery or risk for future falls at 1 month. A large proportion of patients remained at risk for future falls at 1 month in both groups highlighting the need for continued rehabilitation after discharge. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03301584 (Retrospectively registered: 4(th) October 2017).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 161 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 161 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 14%
Student > Master 21 13%
Student > Postgraduate 18 11%
Researcher 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 28 17%
Unknown 50 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 43 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 18%
Arts and Humanities 4 2%
Neuroscience 4 2%
Engineering 3 2%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 61 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2017.
All research outputs
#4,684,987
of 15,892,625 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#964
of 1,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,056
of 325,235 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#120
of 225 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,892,625 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 325,235 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 225 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.