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Global constitutionalism, responsibility to protect, and extra-territorial obligations to realize the right to health: time to overcome the double standard (once again)

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, October 2014
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Global constitutionalism, responsibility to protect, and extra-territorial obligations to realize the right to health: time to overcome the double standard (once again)
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12939-014-0068-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gorik Ooms, Rachel Hammonds

Abstract

If human rights are "inalienable rights of all members of the human family", as is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, then no government should be allowed to deny people of them. When some governments fail to realize them for the people under their jurisdiction, the international community has a responsibility to step in.This extra-territorial effect of human rights was not included in the original conception of human rights. It is of recent date, and, in practice, limited to interventions to end severe violations of civil and political human rights. For economic, social and cultural human rights, extra-territorial obligations are still contested.In this paper, we elaborate three contentions: first, that the realization of social human rights requires the acceptance of and compliance with extra-territorial obligations; second, that compliance with extra-territorial obligations would help transform the international assistance paradigm from charity into legal obligation; and third, that for global constitutionalism to succeed in improving the fairness of the international legal order requires acceptance of the indivisibility of human rights.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Researcher 3 11%
Professor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 8 30%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 10 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Linguistics 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,897,836
of 11,530,102 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#635
of 883 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,932
of 206,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#26
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,530,102 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 883 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 206,492 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.