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Longitudinal study of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in a cohort of swine veterinarians in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
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Title
Longitudinal study of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in a cohort of swine veterinarians in the United States
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2802-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jisun Sun, My Yang, Srinand Sreevatsan, Jeffrey B. Bender, Randall S. Singer, Todd P. Knutson, Douglas G. Marthaler, Peter R. Davies

Abstract

People working with pigs are at elevated risk of harboring methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in their nose, which is attributable to occupational exposure to animals harboring livestock adapted S. aureus. To obtain insight into the biological nature of occupationally related nasal culture positivity, we conducted a longitudinal study of 66 swine veterinarians in the USA. The study cohort resided in 15 US states and worked predominantly with swine. Monthly for 18 months, participants self-collected nasal swabs and completed a survey to report recent exposure to pigs and other animals; the occurrence of work related injuries; and any relevant health events such as skin and soft tissue infections or confirmed staphylococcal infections. Nasal swabs were cultured using selective methods to determine the presence of MRSA and methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and isolates were characterized by spa typing and MLST. Prevalences of S. aureus (64%, monthly range from 58 to 82%) and MRSA (9.5%; monthly range from 6 to15%) were higher than reported for the US population (30% and 1.5% respectively). Predominant spa types were t034 (ST398, 37%), t002 (ST5, 17%) and t337 (ST9/ST398 13%), a distribution similar to that found in a concurrent study in pigs in the USA. Veterinarians were classified into three groups: Persistent carriers (PC, 52%), Intermittent carriers (IC, 47%) and Non-carriers (NC, 1%). Persistent carriage of a single spa type was observed in 14 (21%) of participants, and paired (first and last) isolates from PC subjects had minor genetic differences. Swabs from PC veterinarians carried higher numbers of S. aureus. Among IC veterinarians, culture positivity was significantly associated with recent contact with pigs. Exposure to pigs did not lead to prolonged colonization in most subjects, and the higher numbers of S. aureus in PC subjects suggests that unknown host factors may determine the likelihood of prolonged colonization by S. aureus of livestock origin. Exposure to S. aureus and persistent colonization of swine veterinarians was common but rarely associated with S. aureus disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 3 8%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 18%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 10 25%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,376,659
of 20,832,759 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#713
of 7,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,101
of 340,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#82
of 673 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,832,759 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,158 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,700 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 673 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.