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The impact of influenza on the health related quality of life in China: an EQ-5D survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
The impact of influenza on the health related quality of life in China: an EQ-5D survey
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2801-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan Yang, Mark Jit, Yaming Zheng, Luzhao Feng, Xinxin Liu, Joseph T. Wu, Hongjie Yu

Abstract

Influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality in China, but its impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has not been previously measured. We conducted a retrospective telephone survey to assess the impact of influenza on the HRQoL among outpatients and inpatients using the EuroQoL EQ-5D-3 L instrument. Participants were individuals with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection registered by the National Influenza-like-illness Surveillance Network in 2013. We interviewed 839 of 11,098 eligible influenza patients. After excluding those who were unable to complete the HRQoL for the registered influenza episode, 778 patients were included in the analysis. Both outpatients (n = 529) and inpatients (n = 249) most commonly reported problems with pain/discomfort (71.8% of outpatients and 71.9% of inpatients) and anxiety/depression (62.0% of outpatients and 75.1% of inpatients). For individual influenza outpatients, the mean health utility was 0.6142 (SD 0.2006), and the average quality adjusted life days (QALD) loss was 1.62 (SD 1.84) days. The HRQoL of influenza inpatients was worse (mean health utility 0.5851, SD 0.2197; mean QALD loss 3.51 days, SD 4.25) than that of outpatients (p < 0.05). The presence of underlying medical conditions lowered the HRQoL for both outpatients and inpatients (p < 0.05). Influenza illness had a substantial impact on HRQoL. QALD loss due to an acute influenza episode in younger children was comparable to that due to enterovirus A71-associated hand, foot and mouth disease. Our findings are key inputs into disease burden estimates and cost-effectiveness evaluations of influenza-related interventions in China.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Researcher 7 7%
Other 7 7%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 46 44%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 10%
Psychology 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 51 49%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2017.
All research outputs
#12,488,495
of 14,123,042 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,485
of 5,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#270,096
of 317,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#521
of 667 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 667 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.