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Evidence of reduced recombination rate in human regulatory domains

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), October 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
69 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Evidence of reduced recombination rate in human regulatory domains
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13059-017-1308-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yaping Liu, Abhishek Sarkar, Pouya Kheradpour, Jason Ernst, Manolis Kellis

Abstract

Recombination rate is non-uniformly distributed across the human genome. The variation of recombination rate at both fine and large scales cannot be fully explained by DNA sequences alone. Epigenetic factors, particularly DNA methylation, have recently been proposed to influence the variation in recombination rate. We study the relationship between recombination rate and gene regulatory domains, defined by a gene and its linked control elements. We define these links using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs), chromatin conformation from publicly available datasets (Hi-C and ChIA-PET), and correlated activity links that we infer across cell types. Each link type shows a "recombination rate valley" of significantly reduced recombination rate compared to matched control regions. This recombination rate valley is most pronounced for gene regulatory domains of early embryonic development genes, housekeeping genes, and constitutive regulatory elements, which are known to show increased evolutionary constraint across species. Recombination rate valleys show increased DNA methylation, reduced doublestranded break initiation, and increased repair efficiency, specifically in the lineage leading to the germ line. Moreover, by using only the overlap of functional links and DNA methylation in germ cells, we are able to predict the recombination rate with high accuracy. Our results suggest the existence of a recombination rate valley at regulatory domains and provide a potential molecular mechanism to interpret the interplay between genetic and epigenetic variations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 69 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 32%
Student > Bachelor 12 19%
Researcher 10 16%
Other 4 6%
Student > Master 4 6%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 6%
Engineering 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2019.
All research outputs
#736,690
of 21,105,374 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#609
of 4,005 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,321
of 340,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#67
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,105,374 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,005 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.