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Cretaceous environmental changes led to high extinction rates in a hyperdiverse beetle family

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Cretaceous environmental changes led to high extinction rates in a hyperdiverse beetle family
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12862-014-0220-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gael J Kergoat, Patrice Bouchard, Anne-Laure Clamens, Jessica L Abbate, Hervé Jourdan, Roula Jabbour-Zahab, Gwenaelle Genson, Laurent Soldati, Fabien L Condamine

Abstract

BackgroundAs attested by the fossil record, Cretaceous environmental changes have significantly impacted the diversification dynamics of several groups of organisms. A major biome turnover that occurred during this period was the rise of angiosperms starting ca. 125 million years ago. Though there is evidence that the latter promoted the diversification of phytophagous insects, the response of other insect groups to Cretaceous environmental changes is still largely unknown. To gain novel insights on this issue, we assess the diversification dynamics of a hyperdiverse family of detritivorous beetles (Tenebrionidae) using molecular dating and diversification analyses.ResultsAge estimates reveal an origin after the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction (older than previously thought), followed by the diversification of major lineages during Pangaean and Gondwanan breakups. Dating analyses indicate that arid-adapted species diversified early, while most of the lineages that are adapted to more humid conditions diversified much later. Contrary to other insect groups, we found no support for a positive shift in diversification rates during the Cretaceous; instead there is evidence for an 8.5-fold increase in extinction rates that was not compensated by a joint increase in speciation rates.ConclusionsWe hypothesize that this pattern is better explained by the concomitant reduction of arid environments starting in the mid-Cretaceous, which likely negatively impacted the diversification of arid-adapted species that were predominant at that time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 61 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Master 6 9%
Other 4 6%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 9%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2020.
All research outputs
#2,899,127
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#829
of 2,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,744
of 238,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#30
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,801 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.