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The fitness cost of mis-splicing is the main determinant of alternative splicing patterns

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
122 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The fitness cost of mis-splicing is the main determinant of alternative splicing patterns
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13059-017-1344-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Baptiste Saudemont, Alexandra Popa, Joanna L. Parmley, Vincent Rocher, Corinne Blugeon, Anamaria Necsulea, Eric Meyer, Laurent Duret

Abstract

Most eukaryotic genes are subject to alternative splicing (AS), which may contribute to the production of protein variants or to the regulation of gene expression via nonsense-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) decay (NMD). However, a fraction of splice variants might correspond to spurious transcripts and the question of the relative proportion of splicing errors to functional splice variants remains highly debated. We propose a test to quantify the fraction of AS events corresponding to errors. This test is based on the fact that the fitness cost of splicing errors increases with the number of introns in a gene and with expression level. We analyzed the transcriptome of the intron-rich eukaryote Paramecium tetraurelia. We show that in both normal and in NMD-deficient cells, AS rates strongly decrease with increasing expression level and with increasing number of introns. This relationship is observed for AS events that are detectable by NMD as well as for those that are not, which invalidates the hypothesis of a link with the regulation of gene expression. Our results show that in genes with a median expression level, 92-98% of observed splice variants correspond to errors. We observed the same patterns in human transcriptomes and we further show that AS rates correlate with the fitness cost of splicing errors. These observations indicate that genes under weaker selective pressure accumulate more maladaptive substitutions and are more prone to splicing errors. Thus, to a large extent, patterns of gene expression variants simply reflect the balance between selection, mutation, and drift.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 122 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 123 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 31%
Researcher 31 25%
Student > Master 19 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 3%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 12 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 56 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 35%
Computer Science 6 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Mathematics 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 13 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 86. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2022.
All research outputs
#381,413
of 21,575,819 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#258
of 3,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,563
of 341,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#28
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,575,819 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,989 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.