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Neglected tropical diseases in Brazilian children and adolescents: data analysis from 2009 to 2013

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, November 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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100 Mendeley
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Title
Neglected tropical diseases in Brazilian children and adolescents: data analysis from 2009 to 2013
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-017-0369-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eduardo Brandão, Sebastián Romero, Maria Almerice Lopes da Silva, Fred Luciano Neves Santos

Abstract

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) prevail in conditions of poverty and contribute to the maintenance of social inequality. Out of the NTDs prioritized by the Brazilian Ministry of Health, four parasitic infections require mandatory notification: acute Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, malaria, and schistosomiasis. Data on the behaviour of these NTDs in the young population are currently limited. This study seeks to analyse the epidemiological aspects of these parasitic infections in children and adolescents in Brazil. A retrospective exploratory ecological study was conducted. A spatial analysis of the cases reported between 2009 and 2013 in individuals aged between 0 and 19 years that were notified through the Health Notification Aggravation Information System (SINAN) was performed. In total, 64,567 cases of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, malaria, schistosomiasis, and acute Chagas disease were recorded in the SINAN database, representing a rate of 20.15 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The average age of the cases was 12.2 years and 62.32% were male. Four hundred and three deaths related to these obligatorily reported parasites were recorded, indicating a case fatality rate of 0.62%. Visceral leishmaniasis and acute Chagas disease had the highest rates of lethality. A heterogeneous spatial distribution of the studied parasites was observed. The number of cases and the lethality rate described in this study show that these diseases still represent a serious problem for public health in Brazil. This points to the need to encourage new research and the reformulation of social, economic, and public health policies aimed at ensuring better health and living conditions for all individuals, especially those among the populations considered vulnerable, as is the case of the young.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 100 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 19%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 31 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 6%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 34 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2019.
All research outputs
#14,367,260
of 23,007,053 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#517
of 898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,782
of 329,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#15
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,007,053 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 898 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,019 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.