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An evaluation of the predictive validity of the URICA and ANSOCQ scales for weight gain in adults with AN in an outpatient eating disorders program: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Eating Disorders, November 2017
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Title
An evaluation of the predictive validity of the URICA and ANSOCQ scales for weight gain in adults with AN in an outpatient eating disorders program: a prospective cohort study
Published in
Journal of Eating Disorders, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40337-017-0180-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica Green, Andrea Philipou, David Castle, Leonardo Cistullo, Richard Newton

Abstract

The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) which focuses on stage of change has been the main conceptual model used in understanding the lack of motivation to change in patients with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Whilst there is evidence to support the prognostic value of the TTM in AN, this evidence base sufferers from limitations including limited studies in adults and none in outpatient populations. The primary aim of this study was to clarify whether readiness to change, as measured by the University Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale (URICA) and the Anorexia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire (ANSOCQ) could predict weight gain in adults with AN following treatment in an outpatient setting. This was a prospective cohort analysis, which selectively used data from an existing clinical database at an outpatient eating disorders service. 119 patients met eligibility criteria and were included in this study. This included all adult patients who had a diagnosis of AN and were assessed, but not necessarily treated at the outpatient eating disorders program (Group 1). A subgroup of 63 patients (Group 2) was also analysed which only included patients who had received treatment at the program. Baseline measures included the URICA score, the ANSOCQ score, the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and body mass index (BMI). BMI was also measured on discharge. The URICA scale had poor predictive validity for weight gain (r = 0.05, p = 0.725). The ANSOCQ had moderate predictive validity (Pearson's r = 0.57, p = 0.007), and accounted for 32.7% of variance in weight gain. The URICA and ANSOCQ were moderately correlated in both groups. The URICA was moderately predictive of symptom severity, measured by the EDE-Q in both groups. The ANSOCQ was moderately correlated with the EDE-Q scores in both Groups 1 and 2. To the authors' knowledge this is the only study evaluating stage of change, in an adult outpatient population with AN. The findings of this study suggest that while both the URICA and ANSOCQ were associated with eating disorder symptom severity, only the ANSOCQ was able to predict weight gain in outpatients with AN suggesting its greater utility in this context.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 19%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,127,371
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Eating Disorders
#310
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,059
of 315,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Eating Disorders
#53
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,687 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.