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Genomics and infectious disease: a call to identify the ethical, legal and social implications for public health and clinical practice

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
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Title
Genomics and infectious disease: a call to identify the ethical, legal and social implications for public health and clinical practice
Published in
Genome Medicine, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13073-014-0106-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gail Geller, Rachel Dvoskin, Chloe L Thio, Priya Duggal, Michelle H Lewis, Theodore C Bailey, Andrea Sutherland, Daniel A Salmon, Jeffrey P Kahn

Abstract

Advances in genomics are contributing to the development of more effective, personalized approaches to the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. Genetic sequencing technologies are furthering our understanding of how human and pathogen genomic factors - and their interactions - contribute to individual differences in immunologic responses to vaccines, infections and drug therapies. Such understanding will influence future policies and procedures for infectious disease management. With the potential for tailored interventions for particular individuals, populations or subpopulations, ethical, legal and social implications (ELSIs) may arise for public health and clinical practice. Potential considerations include balancing health-related benefits and harms between individuals and the larger community, minimizing threats to individual privacy and autonomy, and ensuring just distribution of scarce resources. In this Opinion, we consider the potential application of pathogen and host genomic information to particular viral infections that have large-scale public health consequences but differ in ELSI-relevant characteristics such as ease of transmission, chronicity, severity, preventability and treatability. We argue for the importance of anticipating these ELSI issues in advance of new scientific discoveries, and call for the development of strategies for identifying and exploring ethical questions that should be considered as clinical, public health and policy decisions are made.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 18%
Student > Master 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Other 9 8%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 20 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 16%
Computer Science 4 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 3%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 27 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2021.
All research outputs
#1,470,192
of 20,830,231 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#331
of 1,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,098
of 343,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#15
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,830,231 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,338 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.