↓ Skip to main content

Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and metabolic syndrome – the PORMETS study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Endocrine Disorders, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and metabolic syndrome – the PORMETS study
Published in
BMC Endocrine Disorders, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12902-017-0221-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luís Raposo, Sandra Martins, Daniela Ferreira, João Tiago Guimarães, Ana Cristina Santos

Abstract

Vitamin D (VitD) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) play important roles in calcium metabolism and skeletal homeostasis. Estimates of the VitD status in several European countries show large variations between them. In addition, no national population-based estimate has been published. VitD and PTH may also play important roles in cardiovascular risk, which has been suggested to be associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and is very prevalent in Portugal. The goal of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D and its determinants as well as PTH serum level determinants and associations of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH serum levels with MetS and its individual components in a sample of the Portuguese mainland population. PORMETS is a national cross-sectional study that includes a total sample of 4095 adults. A subsample, including 500 participants, was randomly selected for the present study. A structured questionnaire was administered to collect information on personal medical histories and socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics. Blood pressure and anthropometrics measurements were performed. Fasting venous samples were collected and PTH and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured. VitD adequacy was classified according to the Institute of Medicine, and MetS was classified according to the Joint Interim Statement recommendations. Multiple linear regression and unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between the levels of PTH and 25-hydroxyvitamin D and with MetS and its individual components. The prevalence of VitD deficiency was 37.7%, and MetS was present in 191 participants (38.4%). The serum PTH levels showed a positive association (OR: 1.014; 95%CI: 1.002, 1.026) with the waist circumference component of MetS. The serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were negatively associated with MetS (OR: 0.957; 95%CI: 0.922, 0.993) as well as with its blood pressure (OR: 0.949; 95%CI: 0.912, 0.987) and triglycerides (OR: 0.930; 95%CI: 0.892, 0.969) components. This study showed a high national prevalence of hypovitaminosis D. The PTH levels showed a significant positive association with the WC component of MetS, and the VitD levels were negatively associated with the BP and triglycerides components as well as with the MetS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 5 8%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Sports and Recreations 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 20 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2019.
All research outputs
#9,809,073
of 15,422,162 outputs
Outputs from BMC Endocrine Disorders
#211
of 400 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,643
of 409,803 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Endocrine Disorders
#21
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,422,162 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 400 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,803 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.