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N-arachidonoyl glycine, an abundant endogenous lipid, potently drives directed cellular migration through GPR18, the putative abnormal cannabidiol receptor

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, March 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
13 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
240 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
N-arachidonoyl glycine, an abundant endogenous lipid, potently drives directed cellular migration through GPR18, the putative abnormal cannabidiol receptor
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, March 2010
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-11-44
Pubmed ID
Authors

Douglas McHugh, Sherry SJ Hu, Neta Rimmerman, Ana Juknat, Zvi Vogel, J Michael Walker, Heather B Bradshaw

Abstract

Microglia provide continuous immune surveillance of the CNS and upon activation rapidly change phenotype to express receptors that respond to chemoattractants during CNS damage or infection. These activated microglia undergo directed migration towards affected tissue. Importantly, the molecular species of chemoattractant encountered determines if microglia respond with pro- or anti-inflammatory behaviour, yet the signaling molecules that trigger migration remain poorly understood. The endogenous cannabinoid system regulates microglial migration via CB2 receptors and an as yet unidentified GPCR termed the 'abnormal cannabidiol' (Abn-CBD) receptor. Abn-CBD is a synthetic isomer of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) and is inactive at CB1 or CB2 receptors, but functions as a selective agonist at this Gi/o-coupled GPCR. N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) is an endogenous metabolite of the endocannabinoid anandamide and acts as an efficacious agonist at GPR18. Here, we investigate the relationship between NAGly, Abn-CBD, the unidentified 'Abn-CBD' receptor, GPR18, and BV-2 microglial migration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
United States 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 197 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 19%
Researcher 37 18%
Student > Bachelor 29 14%
Student > Master 27 13%
Other 12 6%
Other 27 13%
Unknown 35 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 20 10%
Chemistry 14 7%
Other 35 17%
Unknown 37 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2021.
All research outputs
#6,138,307
of 22,771,140 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#287
of 1,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,466
of 94,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#6
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,771,140 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,243 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.