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Compliance with the Australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years: associations with weight status

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
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Title
Compliance with the Australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years: associations with weight status
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4857-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rute Santos, Zhiguang Zhang, João R. Pereira, Eduarda Sousa-Sá, Dylan P. Cliff, Anthony D. Okely

Abstract

For effective public health and surveillance it is important to document the proportion of young children who meet the new Australian Integrated 24 h Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and how these associate with health outcomes. We aimed to (i) assess compliance with the new Integrated 24 h Movement Guidelines for the Early Years in a sample of Australian toddlers; and (ii) ascertain whether compliance with the guidelines associates with weight status. The sample comprised 202 toddlers (104 girls) aged 19.74 ± 4.07 months from the GET UP! Participants wore accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) for 24 h over 7 consecutive days to assess physical activity, sedentary time and sleep. Parents reported participants' screen time. Weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) z-scores by age and sex were calculated. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to test differences in BMI z-scores between participants complying with (i) none or any individual guideline, (ii) any combination of meeting two guidelines, and (iii) those who met all three guidelines, adjusting for child age, gender and socioeconomic status. Only 8.9% of the sample met the overall 24 h movement guidelines. Most of the sample met the physical activity (96.5%) and sleep (79.7%) guidelines but only 11.4% met the sedentary behavior guideline. Average BMI Z-scores did not significantly differ between children who complied with none or any individual guideline, any combination of meeting two guidelines, and those who met all three guidelines (p > 0.05). Although the lack of significant differences, participants who accomplished any combination of two guidelines or all three guidelines appear to have had a lower BMI Z-score than those complying with one of the guidelines or none. Just under 9% of our sample met the overall Australian 24 h Movement Guidelines for the Early Years. BMI was not associated with the accomplishment of any of the 24-h Movement Guidelines. Strategies to promote adherence to the 24-h movement guidelines in toddlers, particularly for screen time, are necessary, as promoting health-related behaviors in early childhood has the potential to provide children a strong foundation for lifelong physical and mental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 174 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 10%
Researcher 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 5%
Other 31 18%
Unknown 64 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 30 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 14%
Social Sciences 16 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 7%
Psychology 8 5%
Other 10 6%
Unknown 72 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,961,675
of 23,008,860 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,163
of 14,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,548
of 437,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#38
of 159 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,008,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,991 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 437,492 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 159 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.