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Daily electronic monitoring of subjective and objective measures of illness activity in bipolar disorder using smartphones– the MONARCA II trial protocol: a randomized controlled single-blind parallel…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, November 2014
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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78 Dimensions

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350 Mendeley
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Title
Daily electronic monitoring of subjective and objective measures of illness activity in bipolar disorder using smartphones– the MONARCA II trial protocol: a randomized controlled single-blind parallel-group trial
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0309-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Faurholt-Jepsen, Maj Vinberg, Mads Frost, Ellen Margrethe Christensen, Jakob Bardram, Lars Vedel Kessing

Abstract

BackgroundPatients with bipolar disorder often show decreased adherence with mood stabilizers and frequently interventions on prodromal depressive and manic symptoms are delayed.Recently, the MONARCA I randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of electronic self-monitoring on smartphones on depressive and manic symptoms. The findings suggested that patients using the MONARCA system had more sustained depressive symptoms than patients using a smartphone for normal communicative purposes, but had fewer manic symptoms during the trial. It is likely that the ability of these self-monitored measures to detect prodromal symptoms of depression and mania may be insufficient compared to automatically generated objective data on measures of illness activity such as phone usage, social activity, physical activity, and mobility. The Monsenso system, for smartphones integrating subjective and objective measures of illness activity was developed and will be tested in the present trial.MethodsThe MONARCA II trial uses a randomized controlled single-blind parallel-group design. Patients with bipolar disorder according to ICD-10 who previously have been treated at the Copenhagen Clinic for Affective Disorder, Denmark are included and randomized to either daily use of the Monsenso system including an feedback loop between patients and clinicians (the intervention group) or to the use of a smartphone for normal communicative purposes (the control group) for a 9-months trial period. The trial was started in September 2014 and recruitment is ongoing. The outcomes are: differences in depressive and manic symptoms; rate of depressive and manic episodes (primary); automatically generated objective data on measures of illness activity; number of days hospitalized; psychosocial functioning (secondary); perceived stress; quality of life; self-rated depressive symptoms; self-rated manic symptoms; recovery; empowerment and adherence to medication (tertiary) between the intervention group and the control group during the trial. Ethical permission has been obtained. Positive, neutral and negative findings will be published.DiscussionIf the system is effective in reducing depressive and/or manic symptoms (and other symptoms of bipolar disorder) and the rate of episodes, there will be basis for extending the use to the treatment of bipolar disorder in general and in larger scale.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT02221336. Registered 26th of September 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 350 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 344 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 60 17%
Researcher 55 16%
Student > Master 48 14%
Student > Bachelor 32 9%
Other 19 5%
Other 63 18%
Unknown 73 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 72 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 57 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 8%
Social Sciences 22 6%
Computer Science 19 5%
Other 62 18%
Unknown 89 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2015.
All research outputs
#14,790,240
of 22,771,140 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,185
of 4,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,307
of 361,642 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#51
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,771,140 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,679 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 361,642 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.