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Alternative treatment of serious and mild Pasteurella multocida infection in New Zealand White rabbits

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, November 2014
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Title
Alternative treatment of serious and mild Pasteurella multocida infection in New Zealand White rabbits
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12917-014-0276-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Orsolya Palócz, János Gál, Paul Clayton, Zoltán Dinya, Zoltán Somogyi, Csaba Juhász, György Csikó

Abstract

Background Pasteurella multocida causes numerous economically relevant diseases in livestock including rabbits. Immunisation is only variably effective. Prophylactic antibiotics are used in some species but are contra-indicated in rabbits, due to their adverse effects on the rabbit microbiota. There is therefore a substantial need for alternative forms of infection control in rabbits; we investigated the effect of oral ß-glucan on P. multocida infection in this species.ResultsThirthy-five New Zealand White rabbits were randomly divided into five groups of seven animals. Three groups were inoculated with Pasteurella multocida intranasally (in.), a physiologically appropriate challenge which reproduces naturally acquired infection, and received either (1¿3), (1¿6) ß-glucans or placebo. Four other groups were inoculated both in. and intramuscularly (im.), representing a supra-physiological challenge, and received either (1¿3), (1¿6) ß-glucans, antibiotic or placebo. ß-glucans given prophylactically were highly effective in protecting against physiological (in.) bacterial challenge. They were less effective in protecting against supra-physiological bacterial challenge (in. and im.), although they extended survival times. This latter finding has practical relevance to breeders as it extends the window in which heavily infected and symptomatic animals can be salvaged with antibiotics.ConclusionsIn our study, (1¿3), (1¿6) ß-glucans were highly effective in protecting against a model of naturally acquired P. multocida infection and extended survival times in the supra-physiological model. Enrofloxacin was effective in protecting against supra-physiological infection. We are currently reviewing the use of combined prophylaxis.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Other 5 12%
Unspecified 3 7%
Student > Master 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 10%
Unspecified 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2014.
All research outputs
#3,114,800
of 4,553,834 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#493
of 797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,973
of 145,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#20
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,553,834 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 797 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.