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Quantifying seasonal and diel variation in Anopheline and Culex human biting rates in Southern Ecuador

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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15 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Quantifying seasonal and diel variation in Anopheline and Culex human biting rates in Southern Ecuador
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2121-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sadie J. Ryan, Catherine A. Lippi, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Naveed Heydari, Mercy Silva, Jefferson Adrian, Leonardo F. Noblecilla, Efraín B. Ayala, Mayling D. Encalada, David A. Larsen, Jesse T. Krisher, Lyndsay Krisher, Lauren Fregosi, Anna M. Stewart-Ibarra

Abstract

Quantifying mosquito biting rates for specific locations enables estimation of mosquito-borne disease risk, and can inform intervention efforts. Measuring biting itself is fraught with ethical concerns, so the landing rate of mosquitoes on humans is often used as a proxy measure. Southern coastal Ecuador was historically endemic for malaria (Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax), although successful control efforts in the 2000s eliminated autochthonous transmission (since 2011). This study presents an analysis of data collected during the elimination period. Human landing catch (HLC) data for three mosquito taxa: two malaria vectors, Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles punctimacula, and grouped Culex spp. were examined for this study. These data were collected by the National Vector Control Service of the Ministry of Health over a 5-year time span (2007-2012) in five cities in southern coastal Ecuador, at multiple households, in all months of the year, during dusk-dawn (18:00-6:00) hours, often at both indoor and outdoor locations. Hurdle models were used to determine if biting activity was fundamentally different for the three taxa, and to identify spatial and temporal factors influencing bite rate. Due to the many different approaches to studying and quantifying bite rates in the literature, a glossary of terms was created, to facilitate comparative studies in the future. Biting trends varied significantly with species and time. All taxa exhibited exophagic feeding behavior, and outdoor locations increased both the odds and incidence of bites across taxa. Anopheles albimanus was most frequently observed biting, with an average of 4.7 bites/h. The highest and lowest respective months for significant biting activity were March and July for An. albimanus, July and August for An. punctimacula, and February and July for Culex spp. Fine-scale differences in endophagy and exophagy, and temporal differences among months and hours exist in biting patterns among mosquito taxa in southern coastal Ecuador. This analysis provides detailed information for targeting vector control activities, and household level vector prevention strategies. These data were collected as part of routine vector surveillance conducted by the Ministry of Health, and such data have not been collected since. Reinstating such surveillance measures would provide important information to aid in preventing malaria re-emergence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 10%
Environmental Science 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 17 25%
Unknown 24 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,394,244
of 15,917,147 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#627
of 4,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,604
of 411,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#90
of 492 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,917,147 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,496 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 411,985 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 492 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.