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Successional changes in the chicken cecal microbiome during 42 days of growth are independent of organic acid feed additives

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, November 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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89 Dimensions

Readers on

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137 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Successional changes in the chicken cecal microbiome during 42 days of growth are independent of organic acid feed additives
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12917-014-0282-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian B Oakley, R Jeff Buhr, Casey W Ritz, Brian H Kiepper, Mark E Berrang, Bruce S Seal, Nelson A Cox

Abstract

BackgroundPoultry remains a major source of foodborne bacterial infections. A variety of additives with presumed anti-microbial and/or growth-promoting effects are commonly added to poultry feed during commercial grow-out, yet the effects of these additives on the gastrointestinal microbial community (the GI microbiome) as the bird matures remain largely unknown. Here we compared temporal changes in the cecal microbiome to the effects of formic acid, propionic acid, and medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) added to feed and/or drinking water.ResultsCecal bacterial communities at day of hatch (n¿=¿5 birds), 7d (n¿=¿32), 21d (n¿=¿27), and 42d (n¿=¿36) post-hatch were surveyed using direct 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from each bird in combination with cultivation-based recovery of a Salmonella Typhimurium marker strain and quantitative-PCR targeting Clostridium perfringens. Treatment effects on specific pathogens were generally non-significant. S. Typhimurium introduced by oral gavage at day of hatch was recovered by cultivation from nearly all birds sampled across treatments at 7d and 21d, but by 42d, S. Typhimurium was only recovered from ca. 25% of birds, regardless of treatment. Sequencing data also revealed non-significant treatment effects on genera containing known pathogens and on the cecal microbiome as a whole. In contrast, temporal changes in the cecal microbiome were dramatic, highly significant, and consistent across treatments. At 7d, the cecal community was dominated by three genera (Flavonifractor, Pseudoflavonifractor, and a Lachnospiracea sequence type) that accounted for more than half of sequences. By 21d post-hatch, a single genus (Faecalibacterium) accounted for 23-55% of sequences, and the number of Clostridium 16S rRNA gene copies detected by quantitative-PCR reached a maximum.ConclusionsOver the 42 d experiment, the cecal bacterial community changed significantly as measured by a variety of ecological metrics and increases in the complexity of co-occurrence networks. Management of poultry to improve animal health, nutrition, or food safety may need to consider the interactive effects of any treatments with the dramatic temporal shifts in the taxonomic composition of the cecal microbiome as described here.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 134 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 23%
Researcher 26 19%
Student > Master 16 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Student > Bachelor 9 7%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 22 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 40%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 3%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 29 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,162,060
of 5,227,587 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#241
of 899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,191
of 180,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#9
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,227,587 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 899 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 180,466 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.