↓ Skip to main content

Wake up, wake up! It’s me! It’s my life!patient narratives on person-centeredness in the integrated care context: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
117 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Wake up, wake up! It’s me! It’s my life!patient narratives on person-centeredness in the integrated care context: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0619-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Geva Greenfield, Agnieszka M Ignatowicz, Athina Belsi, Yannis Pappas, Josip Car, Azeem Majeed, Matthew Harris

Abstract

BackgroundPerson-centered care emphasizes a holistic, humanistic approach that puts patients first, at the center of medical care. Person-centeredness is also considered a core element of integrated care. Yet typologies of integrated care mainly describe how patients fit within integrated services, rather than how services fit into the patient¿s world. Patient-centeredness has been commonly defined through physician¿s behaviors aimed at delivering patient-centered care. Yet, it is unclear how `person-centeredness¿ is realized in integrated care through the patient voice. We aimed to explore patient narratives of person-centeredness in the integrated care context.MethodsWe conducted a phenomenological, qualitative study, including semi-structured interviews with 22 patients registered in the Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot. We incorporated Grounded Theory approach principles, including substantive open and selective coding, development of concepts and categories, and constant comparison.ResultsWe identified six themes representing core `ingredients¿ of person-centeredness in the integrated care context: ¿Holism¿, ¿Naming¿, ¿Heed¿, ¿Compassion¿, ¿Continuity of care¿, and ¿Agency and Empowerment¿, all depicting patient expectations and assumptions on doctor and patient roles in integrated care. We bring examples showing that when these needs are met, patient experience of care is at its best. Yet many patients felt `unseen¿ by their providers and the healthcare system. We describe how these six themes can portray a continuum between having own physical and emotional `Space¿ to be `seen¿ and heard vs. feeling `translucent¿, `unseen¿, and unheard. These two conflicting experiences raise questions about current typologies of the patient-physician relationship as a `dyad¿, the meanings patients attributed to `care¿, and the theoretical correspondence between `person-centeredness¿ and `integrated care¿.ConclusionsPerson-centeredness is a crucial issue for patients in integrated care, yet it was variably achieved in the current pilot. Patients in the context of integrated care, as in other contexts, strive to have their own unique physical and emotional `space¿ to be `seen¿ and heard. Integrated care models can benefit from incorporating person-centeredness as a core element.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 116 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 19%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Student > Master 16 14%
Researcher 14 12%
Other 11 9%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 14 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 15%
Social Sciences 16 14%
Psychology 12 10%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Other 16 14%
Unknown 21 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,494,846
of 21,321,610 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#504
of 7,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,087
of 345,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#40
of 502 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,610 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,082 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,296 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 502 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.