↓ Skip to main content

Minor physical anomalies in neurodevelopmental disorders: a twin study

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Minor physical anomalies in neurodevelopmental disorders: a twin study
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13034-017-0195-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lynnea Myers, Britt-Marie Anderlid, Ann Nordgren, Charlotte Willfors, Ralf Kuja-Halkola, Kristiina Tammimies, Sven Bölte

Abstract

Minor physical anomalies (MPAs) are subtle anatomical deviations in one's appearance and may suggest altered embryogenesis. MPAs have been shown to be more common in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) compared with typical development. Still, further studies are needed on MPAs in NDDs, especially using twins to adjust for confounding familial factors. Clinical assessments were conducted on 116 twins (61 NDD, 55 controls) from 51 monozygotic and 7 dizygotic pairs to examine MPAs and their association with DSM-5 defined NDDs. Additionally, the relationship between the number of MPAs within twins by zygosity was investigated. Within the cohort sample, a specific association was found between MPAs and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis (crude odds ratio = 1.29, p = .047; adjusted odds ratios = 1.26-1.33, adjusted p values = .032-.073) and autistic traits (crude β = 3.02, p = .002; adjusted β = 2.28, p = .019), but not NDDs in general or ADHD, nor within-pairs. Identified MPAs in ASD included overweight, hypermobility, pes planus, straight eyebrows, vision impairment, arachnodactyly/long toes, long eyelashes, and microtia. The number of MPAs within all monozygotic pairs was highly correlated (r = .88, p < .001). MPAs are more frequent in participants with ASD and may be influenced by genetics. The value of MPAs for (early) detection should be further explored, as they might index individuals at increased risk for ASD in particular.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 14%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 19 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Neuroscience 6 9%
Arts and Humanities 3 5%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 21 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,305,166
of 18,834,855 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#101
of 541 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,328
of 427,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#11
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,834,855 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 541 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 427,440 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.