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The effect on the patient flow in local health care services after closing a suburban primary care emergency department: a controlled longitudinal follow-up study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, November 2017
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2 tweeters

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7 Dimensions

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Title
The effect on the patient flow in local health care services after closing a suburban primary care emergency department: a controlled longitudinal follow-up study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13049-017-0460-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katri Mustonen, Jarmo Kantonen, Timo Kauppila

Abstract

It has not been studied what happens to patient flow to EDs and other parts of local health care system if distances to ED services are manipulated as a part of health policy in urban areas. The present work was an observational and quasi-experimental study with a control and it was based on before-after comparisons. The impact of terminating a geographically distant suburban primary care ED on patient flow to doctors in local public primary care EDs, office-hour primary care, secondary care EDs and in private primary care was studied. The effect of this intervention was compared with a primary care system where no similar intervention was performed. The number of monthly visits to doctors in different departments of health care was scored as the main measure of the study in each department studied (e.g. in primary care EDs, secondary care ED, office-hour public primary care and private primary care). Monthly mortality rates were also recorded. Increasing the distance to ED services by terminating a peripheral ED did not cause an increase in the use of local office-hour services in those areas whose local ED was terminated, although use of ED services decreased by 25% in these areas (P < 0.001). The total use of primary care doctor services rather decreased - if anything - after this intervention while use of doctor services in secondary care ED remained unaffected. Doctor visits to the complementary private primary care increased but this was probably not associated with the intervention because a simultaneous increase in this parameter was observed in the control. There was no increased mortality in any age groups. Manipulating distances to ED services can be used to direct patient flows to different parts of the health care system. The correlation between distance to ED and the tendency to use ED by inhabitants is negative. If secondary care ED was available there were no life-threatening side-effects at the level of general public health when a minor ED was closed in a primary care ED system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 24%
Student > Master 4 19%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 4 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 24%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Unknown 7 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,024,329
of 12,219,921 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#486
of 763 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,434
of 339,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#22
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,921 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 763 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.