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Laser-modified titanium surfaces enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, November 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Laser-modified titanium surfaces enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13287-017-0717-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antônio Carlos Guastaldi, Edson A. Filho, Jéssyca T. da Fonseca, Jana Dara Freires de Queiroz, Silvia Regina Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Susana Margarida Gomes Moreira, Tatiana A. B. Bressel

Abstract

Titanium surfaces have been modified by various approaches with the aim of improving the stimulation of osseointegration. Laser beam (Yb-YAG) treatment is a controllable and flexible approach to modifying surfaces. It creates a complex surface topography with micro and nano-scaled patterns, and an oxide layer that can improve the osseointegration of implants, increasing their usefulness as bone implant materials. Laser beam irradiation at various fluences (132, 210, or 235 J/cm2) was used to treat commercially pure titanium discs to create complex surface topographies. The titanium discs were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of contact angles. The surface generated at a fluence of 235 J/cm2 was used in the biological assays. The behavior of mesenchymal stem cells from an umbilical cord vein was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, a mineralization assay, and an alkaline phosphatase activity assay and by carrying out a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for osteogenic markers. CHO-k1 cells were also exposed to titanium discs in the MTT assay. The best titanium surface was that produced by laser beam irradiation at 235 J/cm2 fluence. Cell proliferation analysis revealed that the CHO-k1 and mesenchymal stem cells behaved differently. The laser-processed titanium surface increased the proliferation of CHO-k1 cells, reduced the proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells, upregulated the expression of the osteogenic markers, and enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity. The laser-treated titanium surface modulated cellular behavior depending on the cell type, and stimulated osteogenic differentiation. This evidence supports the potential use of laser-processed titanium surfaces as bone implant materials, and their use in regenerative medicine could promote better outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 14%
Materials Science 4 10%
Engineering 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,661,017
of 12,259,388 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#603
of 1,024 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,912
of 343,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#57
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,259,388 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,024 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,167 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.