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Does the oviparity-viviparity transition alter the partitioning of yolk in embryonic snakes?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
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Title
Does the oviparity-viviparity transition alter the partitioning of yolk in embryonic snakes?
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1083-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yan-Qing Wu, Yan-Fu Qu, Xue-Ji Wang, Jian-Fang Gao, Xiang Ji

Abstract

The oviparity-viviparity transition is a major evolutionary event, likely altering the reproductive process of the organisms involved. Residual yolk, a portion of yolk remaining unutilized at hatching or birth as parental investment in care, has been investigated in many oviparous amniotes but remained largely unknown in viviparous species. Here, we used data from 20 (12 oviparous and 8 viviparous) species of snakes to see if the oviparity-viviparity transition alters the partitioning of yolk in embryonic snakes. We used ANCOVA to test whether offspring size, mass and components at hatching or birth differed between the sexes in each species. We used both ordinary least squares and phylogenetic generalized least squares regressions to test whether relationships between selected pairs of offspring components were significant. We used phylogenetic ANOVA to test whether offspring components differed between oviparous and viviparous species and, more specifically, the hypothesis that viviparous snakes invest more in the yolk as parental investment in embryogenesis to produce more well developed offspring that are larger in linear size. In none of the 20 species was sex a significant source of variation in any offspring component examined. Newborn viviparous snakes on average contained proportionally more water and, after accounting for body dry mass, had larger carcasses but smaller residual yolks than did newly hatched oviparous snakes. The rates at which carcass dry mass (CDM) and fat body dry mass (FDM) increased with residual yolk dry mass (YDM) did not differ between newborn oviparous and viviparous snakes. Neither CDM nor FDM differed between newborn oviparous and viviparous snakes after accounting for YDM. Our results are not consistent with the hypothesis that the partitioning of yolk between embryonic and post-embryonic stages differs between snakes that differ in parity mode, but instead show that the partitioning of yolk in embryonic snakes is species-specific or phylogenetically related. We conclude that the oviparity-viviparity transition does not alter yolk partitioning in embryonic snakes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 22%
Other 3 17%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 17%
Environmental Science 2 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2017.
All research outputs
#11,689,652
of 19,151,080 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,038
of 2,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,389
of 428,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#181
of 241 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,151,080 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 241 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.