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Management of overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a low resource setting: a real world report from Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
Management of overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a low resource setting: a real world report from Nigeria
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12876-014-0210-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Olusegun I Alatise, Adeniyi S Aderibigbe, Adewale O Adisa, Olusegun Adekanle, Augustine E Agbakwuru, Anthony O Arigbabu

Abstract

BackgroundUpper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a common medical problem worldwide that has significant associated morbidity, mortality, and health care resource use. This study outlines the aetiology, clinical presentation, and treatment outcomes of patients with UGIB in a Nigerian low resource health facility.MethodsThis was a descriptive study of consecutive patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy for upper GI bleeding in the endoscopy unit of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2013.ResultsDuring the study period, 287 (12.4%) of 2,320 patients who underwent upper GI endoscopies had UGIB. Of these, 206 (72.0%) patients were males and their ages ranged from 3 to 100 years with a median age of 49 years. The main clinical presentation included passage of melaena stool in 268 (93.4%) of individuals, 173 (60.3%) had haematemesis, 110 (38.3%) had haematochezia, and 161 (56.1%) were dizzy at presentation. Observed in 88 (30.6%) of UGIB patients, duodenal ulcer was the most common cause, followed by varices [52 (18.1%)] and gastritis [51 (17.1%)]. For variceal bleeding, 15 (28.8%) and 21 (40.4%) of patients had injection sclerotherapy and variceal band ligation, respectively. The overall rebleeding rate for endoscopic therapy for varices was 16.7%. For patients with ulcers, only 42 of 55 who had Forrest grade Ia to IIb ulcers were offered endoscopic therapy. Endoscopic therapy was áin 90.5% of the cases. No rebleeding followed endoscopic therapy for the ulcers. The obtained Rockall scores ranged from 2 to 10 and the median was 5.0. Of all patients, 92.7% had medium or high risk scores. An increase in Rockall score was significantly associated with length of hospital stay and mortality (p¿<¿0.001). The overall mortality rate was 5.9% (17 patients).ConclusionEndoscopic therapy for UGIB in a resource-poor setting such as Nigeria is feasible, significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, and is cost effective. Efforts should be made to improve the accessibility of these therapeutic procedure for patients with UGIB in Nigeria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 80 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 17 21%
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 56%
Social Sciences 7 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Computer Science 1 1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 17 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2017.
All research outputs
#7,383,234
of 12,373,180 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#355
of 800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,281
of 275,367 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#46
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 800 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,367 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.