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The challenges for molecular nutrition research 1: linking genotype to healthy nutrition

Overview of attention for article published in Genes & Nutrition, June 2008
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Title
The challenges for molecular nutrition research 1: linking genotype to healthy nutrition
Published in
Genes & Nutrition, June 2008
DOI 10.1007/s12263-008-0086-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine M. Williams, Jose M. Ordovas, Dennis Lairon, John Hesketh, Georg Lietz, Mike Gibney, Ben van Ommen

Abstract

Nutrition science finds itself at a major crossroad. On the one hand we can continue the current path, which has resulted in some substantial advances, but also many conflicting messages which impair the trust of the general population, especially those who are motivated to improve their health through diet. The other road is uncharted and is being built over the many exciting new developments in life sciences. This new era of nutrition recognizes the complex relation between the health of the individual, its genome, and the life-long dietary exposure, and has lead to the realisation that nutrition is essentially a gene-environment interaction science. This review on the relation between genotype, diet and health is the first of a series dealing with the major challenges in molecular nutrition, analyzing the foundations of nutrition research. With the unravelling of the human genome and the linking of its variability to a multitude of phenotypes from "healthy" to an enormously complex range of predispositions, the dietary modulation of these propensities has become an area of active research. Classical genetic approaches applied so far in medical genetics have steered away from incorporating dietary effects in their models and paradoxically, most genetic studies analyzing diet-associated phenotypes and diseases simply ignore diet. Yet, a modest but increasing number of studies are accounting for diet as a modulator of genetic associations. These range from observational cohorts to intervention studies with prospectively selected genotypes. New statistical and bioinformatics approaches are becoming available to aid in design and evaluation of these studies. This review discusses the various approaches used and provides concrete recommendations for future research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Thailand 1 1%
Unknown 76 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 21%
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 7 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2014.
All research outputs
#5,603,412
of 7,406,773 outputs
Outputs from Genes & Nutrition
#180
of 238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,231
of 234,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genes & Nutrition
#14
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,406,773 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 238 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.