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Periodontitis and gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
144 Mendeley
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Title
Periodontitis and gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1145-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samuel A. Abariga, Brian W. Whitcomb

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is glucose intolerance with first onset during pregnancy and is associated with serious maternal and fetal complications. The etiology of GDM is not well understood, but systemic inflammation effects on insulin signaling and glucose metabolism is suspected. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that induces local and host immune responses and has been evaluated for a potential role in development of GDM. Results from studies evaluating the association between periodontitis and GDM are mixed. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize available data regarding the association between periodontitis and GDM. Twelve electronic databases were searched for observational studies of the association between periodontitis and GDM through March 2016. Eligible studies were assessed for quality and heterogeneity. Random effects models were used to estimate summary measures of association. We identified 44 articles from 115 potentially relevant reports of which 10 studies met our eligibility criteria. Clinical diagnostic criteria for periodontitis and GDM varied widely among studies, and moderate heterogeneity was observed. Random effects meta-analysis of all included studies with a total of 5724 participants including 624 cases, showed that periodontitis is associated with an increased risk of GDM by 66 %, (OR = 1.66, 95 % CI: 1.17 to 2.36; p < 0.05), I(2) = 50.5 %. Similar results were seen in sub-analysis restricted to data from methodologically high quality case-control studies including 1176 participants including 380 cases, (OR = 1.85, 95 % CI: 1.03 to 3.32); p < 0.05), I(2) = 68.4 %. Meta-analysis of studies that adjusted for potential confounders estimated more than 2-fold increased odds of GDM among women with periodontitis (aOR = 2.08, 95 % CI: 1.21 to 3.58, p = 0.009, I(2) = 36.9 %). Meta-analysis suggests that periodontitis is associated with a statistically significant increased risk for GDM compared to women without periodontitis. Robust prospective study designs and uniform definition for periodontitis and GDM definitions are urgently needed to substantiate these findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 144 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 12%
Student > Postgraduate 12 8%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Researcher 8 6%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 45 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 73 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Unspecified 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 45 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2020.
All research outputs
#1,794,803
of 23,009,818 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#457
of 4,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,119
of 313,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#9
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,009,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,236 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,510 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.