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Deletion of the hfsB gene increases ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and several other thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, November 2017
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Title
Deletion of the hfsB gene increases ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and several other thermophilic anaerobic bacteria
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13068-017-0968-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ayşenur Eminoğlu, Sean Jean-Loup Murphy, Marybeth Maloney, Anthony Lanahan, Richard J. Giannone, Robert L. Hettich, Shital A. Tripathi, Ali Osman Beldüz, Lee R. Lynd, Daniel G. Olson

Abstract

With the discovery of interspecies hydrogen transfer in the late 1960s (Bryant et al. in Arch Microbiol 59:20-31, 1967), it was shown that reducing the partial pressure of hydrogen could cause mixed acid fermenting organisms to produce acetate at the expense of ethanol. Hydrogen and ethanol are both more reduced than glucose. Thus there is a tradeoff between production of these compounds imposed by electron balancing requirements; however, the mechanism is not fully known. Deletion of the hfsA or B subunits resulted in a roughly 1.8-fold increase in ethanol yield. The increase in ethanol production appears to be associated with an increase in alcohol dehydrogenase activity, which appears to be due, at least in part, to increased expression of the adhE gene, and may suggest a regulatory linkage between hfsB and adhE. We studied this system most intensively in the organism Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum; however, deletion of hfsB also increases ethanol production in other thermophilic bacteria suggesting that this could be used as a general technique for engineering thermophilic bacteria for improved ethanol production in organisms with hfs-type hydrogenases. Since its discovery by Shaw et al. (JAMA 191:6457-64, 2009), the hfs hydrogenase has been suspected to act as a regulator due to the presence of a PAS domain. We provide additional support for the presence of a regulatory phenomenon. In addition, we find a practical application for this scientific insight, namely increasing ethanol yield in strains that are of interest for ethanol production from cellulose or hemicellulose. In two of these organisms (T. xylanolyticum and T. thermosaccharolyticum), the ethanol yields are the highest reported to date.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 22%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Chemical Engineering 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,698,408
of 12,320,043 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#549
of 957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,547
of 346,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#34
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,320,043 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 957 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.