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Whole genome sequencing-based detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence in non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica isolated from wildlife

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, November 2017
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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42 Dimensions

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Whole genome sequencing-based detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence in non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica isolated from wildlife
Published in
Gut Pathogens, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13099-017-0213-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milton Thomas, Gavin John Fenske, Linto Antony, Sudeep Ghimire, Ronald Welsh, Akhilesh Ramachandran, Joy Scaria

Abstract

The aim of this study was to generate a reference set of Salmonella enterica genomes isolated from wildlife from the United States and to determine the antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profile of the isolates from the genome sequence data. We sequenced the whole genomes of 103 Salmonella isolates sampled between 1988 and 2003 from wildlife and exotic pet cases that were submitted to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Among 103 isolates, 50.48% were from wild birds, 0.9% was from fish, 24.27% each were from reptiles and mammals. 50.48% isolates showed resistance to at least one antibiotic. Resistance against the aminoglycoside streptomycin was most common while 9 isolates were found to be multi-drug resistant having resistance against more than three antibiotics. Determination of virulence gene profile revealed that the genes belonging to csg operons, the fim genes that encode for type 1 fimbriae and the genes belonging to type III secretion system were predominant among the isolates. The universal presence of fimbrial genes and the genes encoded by pathogenicity islands 1-2 among the isolates we report here indicates that these isolates could potentially cause disease in humans. Therefore, the genomes we report here could be a valuable reference point for future traceback investigations when wildlife is considered to be the potential source of human Salmonellosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 23%
Student > Master 10 14%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 7%
Environmental Science 4 6%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 25 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,714,638
of 12,793,889 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#143
of 285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,194
of 387,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#23
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,793,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 387,251 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.