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Clinical skills of veterinary students – a cross-sectional study of the self-concept and exposure to skills training in Hannover, Germany

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical skills of veterinary students – a cross-sectional study of the self-concept and exposure to skills training in Hannover, Germany
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12917-014-0302-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tanja Rösch, Elisabeth Schaper, Andrea Tipold, Martin R Fischer, Marc Dilly, Jan P Ehlers

Abstract

BackgroundStudents of veterinary medicine should achieve basic professional competences required to practise their profession. A main focus of veterinary education is on developing clinical skills.The present study used the guidelines of the ¿Day-One Skills¿ list of European Association of Establishments for Veterinary Education (EAEVE) to create an online questionnaire for assessing the skills acquired by students at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover (TiHo). The theoretical and practical veterinary knowledge levels of the students and postgraduates are determined and compared.ResultsIn two batches, 607 people responded (response batch 1, 23.78%; response batch 2, 23.83%). From 49 defined skills, 28 are actually practised during training at the university and 21 activities are known only theoretically. Furthermore, the students showed great willingness to use simulators and models in a clinical skills lab.ConclusionsThe results of this survey highlight that the opening of a clinical skills lab at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover and its incorporation into the study programme are ideal tools to promote practical competences and foster the motivation to learn.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 26%
Student > Master 10 13%
Researcher 7 9%
Other 6 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 6%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 16 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 31 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 17 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2015.
All research outputs
#7,392,570
of 22,775,504 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#627
of 3,045 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,532
of 353,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#21
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,775,504 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,045 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,115 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.