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Impact of extreme weather events and climate change for health and social care systems

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
56 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
259 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of extreme weather events and climate change for health and social care systems
Published in
Environmental Health, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12940-017-0324-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Curtis, Alistair Fair, Jonathan Wistow, Dimitri V. Val, Katie Oven

Abstract

This review, commissioned by the Research Councils UK Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) programme, concerns research on the impacts on health and social care systems in the United Kingdom of extreme weather events, under conditions of climate change. Extreme weather events considered include heatwaves, coldwaves and flooding. Using a structured review method, we consider evidence regarding the currently observed and anticipated future impacts of extreme weather on health and social care systems and the potential of preparedness and adaptation measures that may enhance resilience. We highlight a number of general conclusions which are likely to be of international relevance, although the review focussed on the situation in the UK. Extreme weather events impact the operation of health services through the effects on built, social and institutional infrastructures which support health and health care, and also because of changes in service demand as extreme weather impacts on human health. Strategic planning for extreme weather and impacts on the care system should be sensitive to within country variations. Adaptation will require changes to built infrastructure systems (including transport and utilities as well as individual care facilities) and also to institutional and social infrastructure supporting the health care system. Care sector organisations, communities and individuals need to adapt their practices to improve resilience of health and health care to extreme weather. Preparedness and emergency response strategies call for action extending beyond the emergency response services, to include health and social care providers more generally.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 259 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 259 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 14%
Researcher 34 13%
Student > Master 33 13%
Student > Bachelor 25 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 7%
Other 40 15%
Unknown 71 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 30 12%
Social Sciences 25 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 8%
Engineering 19 7%
Other 52 20%
Unknown 91 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2022.
All research outputs
#1,001,836
of 21,467,894 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#218
of 1,424 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,878
of 444,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#30
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,467,894 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,424 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 444,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.