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Timing, rates, and causes of death in a large South African tuberculosis programme

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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100 Mendeley
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Title
Timing, rates, and causes of death in a large South African tuberculosis programme
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0679-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nigel Field, Megan SC Lim, Jill Murray, Robert J Dowdeswell, Judith R Glynn, Pam Sonnenberg

Abstract

BackgroundTuberculosis (TB) mortality remains high across sub-Saharan Africa despite integration of TB and HIV/ART programmes. To inform programme design and service delivery, we estimated mortality by time from starting TB treatment.MethodsRoutinely collected data on TB treatment, vital status, and the timing and causes of death, were linked to cardio-respiratory autopsy data, from 1995¿2008, from a cohort of male platinum miners in South Africa. Records were expanded into person-months at risk (pm).Results4162 TB episodes were registered; 3170 men were treated for the first time and 833 men underwent retreatment. Overall, 509 men died, with a case fatality of 12.2% and mortality rate of 2.0/100 pm. Mortality was highest in the first month after starting TB treatment for first (2.3/100 pm) and retreatment episodes (4.8/100 pm). When stratified by HIV status, case fatality was higher in HIV positive men not on ART (first episode 14.0%; retreatment episode 26.2%) and those on ART (12.0%; 22.0%) than men of negative or unknown HIV status (2.6%; 3.6%). Mortality was also highest in the first month for each of these groups. Mortality risk factors included older age, previous TB, HIV, pulmonary TB, and diagnostic uncertainty. The proportion of deaths attributable to TB was consistently overestimated in clinical records versus cardio-respiratory autopsy.ConclusionsProgramme mortality was highest in those with HIV and during the first month of TB treatment in all groups, and many deaths were not caused by TB. Resource allocation should prioritise TB prevention and accurate earlier diagnosis, recognise the role of HIV, and ensure effective clinical care in the early stages of TB treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 100 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 23%
Student > Master 19 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 18 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Mathematics 3 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 23 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2016.
All research outputs
#10,407,211
of 18,982,937 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,396
of 6,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,159
of 326,652 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#222
of 638 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,982,937 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,657 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,652 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 638 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.