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Socioeconomic factors associated with cessation of injection drug use among street-involved youth

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, December 2017
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Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Socioeconomic factors associated with cessation of injection drug use among street-involved youth
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0136-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Derek C. Chang, Scott E. Hadland, Ekaterina Nosova, Evan Wood, Thomas Kerr, Kora DeBeck

Abstract

Although the initiation of injection drug use has been well characterized among at-risk youth, factors that support or impede cessation of injection drug use have received less attention. We sought to identify socioeconomic factors associated with cessation of injection drug use among street-involved youth. From September 2005 to May 2015, data were collected from the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), a prospective cohort study of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. Multivariate extended Cox regression was utilized to identify socioeconomic factors associated with cessation of injection drug use for six months or longer among youth who were actively injecting. Among 383 participants, 171 (44.6%) youth reported having ceased injection (crude incidence density 22 per 100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 19-26) at some point during study follow-up. Youth who had recently dealt drugs (adjusted hazard ration [AHR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.29-0.87), engaged in prohibited street-based income generation (AHR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.24-0.69), and engaged in illegal income generating activities (AHR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.06-0.61) were significantly less likely to report cessation of injection drug use. Our findings suggest that socioeconomic factors, in particular engagement in prohibited street-based and illegal income generating activities, may pose barriers to ceasing injection drug use among this population. Effort to improve access to stable and secure income, as well as employment opportunities may assist youth in transitioning away from injection drug use. Our study is not a randomized controlled trial; thus the trial registration is not applicable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 20%
Student > Master 10 18%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 5%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 17 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 11 20%
Psychology 6 11%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 20 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,056,341
of 21,691,316 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#351
of 685 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,461
of 445,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#24
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,691,316 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 685 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 445,681 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.