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Antagonistic roles in fetal development and adult physiology for the oppositely imprinted Grb10 and Dlk1genes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, December 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Antagonistic roles in fetal development and adult physiology for the oppositely imprinted Grb10 and Dlk1genes
Published in
BMC Biology, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12915-014-0099-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Madon-Simon, Michael Cowley, Alastair S Garfield, Kim Moorwood, Steven R Bauer, Andrew Ward

Abstract

Despite being a fundamental biological problem the control of body size and proportions during development remains poorly understood, although it is accepted that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway has a central role in growth regulation, probably in all animals. The involvement of imprinted genes has also attracted much attention, not least because two of the earliest discovered were shown to be oppositely imprinted and antagonistic in their regulation of growth. The Igf2 gene encodes a paternally expressed ligand that promotes growth, while maternally expressed Igf2r encodes a cell surface receptor that restricts growth by sequestering Igf2 and targeting it for lysosomal degradation. There are now over 150 imprinted genes known in mammals, but no other clear examples of antagonistic gene pairs have been identified. The delta-like 1 gene (Dlk1) encodes a putative ligand that promotes fetal growth and in adults restricts adipose deposition. Conversely, Grb10 encodes an intracellular signalling adaptor protein that, when expressed from the maternal allele, acts to restrict fetal growth and is permissive for adipose deposition in adulthood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 11 24%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2015.
All research outputs
#534,330
of 12,537,999 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#157
of 1,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,193
of 285,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#5
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,537,999 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,211 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.